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1908 map showing the C G & P making it just pass Russelville in Brown County

The Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth RR depot at California, Ohio in Hamilton Co. The village of California is now called Big Plain and is a neighborhood within Cincinnati. 

Mark Howell collection

the Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad (CG&P) crew working on the fill on Day Hill Road in Brown Co., Ohio to open the line to Russellville. 

Mark Howell collection

C G & P RR from the Aaron Seeley collection

Of the men standing in front of the Carrel Street Station the 2nd man from the right is grandfather of Vicki Rafferty, Robert E. Havemann, who was the station agent at the Carrel St. Station 

Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad Bridge after it fell into the Little Miami River October 6th, 1910

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American Narrow Gauge Railroads by George Woodman Hilton

Cincinnati, Georgetown and Portsmouth Railroad #60

Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad Co.
The railroad that never made it to Portsmouth, Ohio

Cincinnati, Georgetown and Portsmouth Railroad #105 taken at Georgetown c 1910


Curved-side Trolley Car, Portsmouth

Cincinnati, Georgetown and Portsmouth Railroad #145

 Some History
C G & P was a narrow gauge steam railroad organized by Henry Brachmann in 1873. A narrow gauge line (3-ft. between rails) was cheaper to build than a standard gauge (4-ft. 8 ½ inches). After bankruptcy in 1877, it was reorganized as the Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad

The route entered Clermont County at Clough Pike and curved northward to Mt. Carmel, and then east through Summerside, Glen Este, Willowville to Olive Branch. It then went south to Amelia. From there it went east to Hamlet and Bethel before entering Brown County. Construction began in 1876 and the first train ran to Mt. Carmel in 1877. The line was completed to Georgetown in 1886. The line never made it to Portsmouth, because the Cincinnati & Eastern Railroad (later called the Norfolk & Western) reached there first.

In 1901 Andrew Comstock bought the line and modernized it. He changed the gauge to standard, filled in the culverts, straightened curves and electrified it. He built a modern electric generating plant at Olive Branch and a lake to provide cooling water for the plant. Not only did the electric plant provide power for the railcars, it also provided electricity for the hamlets along the railroad, including Batavia. Renamed the Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad, 1880 Construction to Georgetown completed, 1886 Dual (narrow and standard) gauge California waterworks branch built, 1899 Converted to Standard Gauge & Electrified, Waterworks branch extended to Coney Island and broad gauge rail added,1902 Batavia branch completed, 1903 Russellville branch completed, 1905 Felicity & Bethel branch completed, 1906 Reorganized as the Cincinnati-Georgetown Railroad Co., 1927 California branch abandoned east of the waterworks, 1927 Felicity & Bethel branch abandoned, 1933 Batavia and Russellville branches abandoned, 1934 Passenger service suspended, and all service abandoned east of Bethel, 1935 All service abandoned, remaining route between Carrell Street and the waterworks sold to the city, 1936 City waterworks use suspended, 1943